Posts Tagged ‘Tasmania’

Greatest Hits: Bay of Fires by Poppy Gee

January 8, 2014

bay of firesKick off the new year with The Book-A-Day Blog’s most popular posts of 2013! 

Bay of Fires, a wonderful debut novel by Poppy Gee, is set in a remote holiday town on the east coast of Tasmania. Sarah Avery has lost her job and is spending some time with her parents in the cabin they visit every summer. Her idea of hiding away quietly is shattered when she finds the body of a young woman on her favorite beach. Last year, another young woman was found dead in the same area, at the same time of summer. Suddenly, Sarah’s family, and the friends she has known her entire life, become suspects. Their lives and their secrets are splashed across the national news. Families who have known each other for years become divided between the wealthy owners of the holiday cottages and the poorer vacationers who stay in the campground. People point fingers at the disfigured man who lives alone with his cats at the edge of the woods. Suspicion and distrust infect what was once a close knit community.

The arrival of reporter Hall Flynn does nothing to ease the pressure on the locals, especially Sarah. The reasons why she left her job, her boyfriend, and the home she recently bought to live with her parents again, become topics of discussion. Even worse, she finds herself attracted to Flynn despite all her attempts to avoid him.  Flynn himself is also in a bit of a bind. His publisher is on his back over his lack of recent moneymaking stories.  No one in town wants to cooperate with him, though, because he is an outsider. Eventually, Flynn and Sarah have to join forces to track down the murderer.

I loved the unusual setting and the spooky atmosphere of this book. The author does a wonderful job of describing the wild nature of Tasmania’s east coast, and the insular nature of a small, isolated community. The novel is more a character study than a traditional mystery, and the setting becomes an important part of the puzzle. While the pacing may seem slow to some, I enjoyed the way it gradually built up the suspense. I would recommend this book, especially to fans of Elizabeth George or Tana French.

Find and reserve this book in our catalog.

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Best New Books of 2013: Pam W’s Picks

December 11, 2013

My reading tastes are kind of all over the map, but I especially enjoy mysteries and historical fiction.  This year my list is full of lots of new authors.  I’ve read and really liked many of the books that are at the top of the best seller’s lists, but here are five of my favorites that might be less well known.

The House Girl by Tara Conklin
Conkin’s novel alternates between the story of Josephine, a slave in Virginia during the 1850’s at a failing plantation; and Lina, a first year associate of a large corporate law firm in present day New York who is working on what her boss calls a history making case. Lina’s case requires her to find a descendant of a slave who would like to be a plaintiff in a case over who painted a series of famous paintings that have long been attributed to Lu Ann Bell, but now are believed to have been painted by her slave.  As Lina investigates the case, the novel switches back to tell Josephine’s story.  Josephine’s was the more riveting tale, but the modern story was interesting as well. I look forward to more by this author.

Bay of Fires by Poppy Gee
Bay of Fires, a wonderful debut novel by Poppy Gee, is set in a remote holiday town on the east coast of Tasmania. Sarah Avery has lost her job and is spending some time with her parents in the cabin they visit every summer.  Sarah is fishing when she finds the body of a young woman on her favorite beach.   Suddenly, Sarah’s family and friends become murder suspects.  I loved the unusual setting and the spooky atmosphere of this book.  The author does a wonderful job of describing the wild nature of Tasmania’s east coast, and the insular nature of a small, isolated community. Check out my full-length post here.

Visitation Street by Ivy Pochoda
Pochoda’s novel starts off with two bored young girls on a slow, hot evening in Brooklyn.  The girls want to do exciting, something that will make their lives more interesting and prove they are more grown up.  Later that evening, one girl is found on the shore unconscious and the other is missing.  What happened, and who is responsible?  Is it the teacher who found the unconscious Val?  The young man who was known to be the last to speak to the girls? Pochoda’s focus is less on the police investigation than on the description of the neighborhood and its residents.  But this is the beauty of her book.  By the time I finished, I felt like had visited Red Hook, Brooklyn, and that her characters had become my neighbors.  I hated to leave them when the book ended.

Amity and Sorrow by Peggy Riley
Amity and Sorrow is a moving tale of a woman trying to undo a terrible mistake she made when she was young.  After losing her family, she took up with a charismatic man who took her to live in a remote area.  Years later, she is fleeing from him and the cult he has created. Amaranth is terrified that her husband will follow her to force her and her two daughters to return.  The girls are unable to imagine what their lives will be like outside of the family.  The older daughter, Sorrow, has no intention of leaving the only life she has ever known and is fighting her mother every step of the way.  The younger daughter, Amity, is caught between her mother and her sister.  Riley’s writing is spare but she is able to paint a vivid picture.  You will find yourself hoping for redemption for Amaranth and her family, no matter what she has done in the past. See my full-length post here.

The Last Runaway by Tracy Chevalier
Honor Bright is from a Quaker community in England.  Jilted by her fiance, she decides to go with her sister to Ohio for her sister’s wedding.  Tragedy strikes, though, and when her sister dies, Honor doesn’t know what to do except finish the journey and bring the news to the man who was to be her brother-in-law.  Along the way, she is introduced to the issue of slavery and the return of escaped slaves in a frightening incident.  As a Quaker, Honor is firmly against slavery.  But the small community she has come to is in a difficult situation.  If they are seen to help the runaways, they risk losing their own lively hoods or more.  This dilemma is what Honor has to navigate in her new unexpected situation. She is dependent on the kindness of people she is not related to, and cannot upset them.  But she also wants to live according to her morals. Chevalier’s take on the issue of slavery is unique, and Honor was an engaging character.  Fans of historical fiction will really enjoy this one.

Bay of Fires by Poppy Gee

July 3, 2013

bay of firesBay of Fires, a wonderful debut novel by Poppy Gee, is set in a remote holiday town on the east coast of Tasmania. Sarah Avery has lost her job and is spending some time with her parents in the cabin they visit every summer. Her idea of hiding away quietly is shattered when she finds the body of a young woman on her favorite beach. Last year, another young woman was found dead in the same area, at the same time of summer. Suddenly, Sarah’s family, and the friends she has known her entire life, become suspects. Their lives and their secrets are splashed across the national news. Families who have known each other for years become divided between the wealthy owners of the holiday cottages and the poorer vacationers who stay in the campground. People point fingers at the disfigured man who lives alone with his cats at the edge of the woods. Suspicion and distrust infect what was once a close knit community.

The arrival of reporter Hall Flynn does nothing to ease the pressure on the locals, especially Sarah. The reasons why she left her job, her boyfriend, and the home she recently bought to live with her parents again, become topics of discussion. Even worse, she finds herself attracted to Flynn despite all her attempts to avoid him.  Flynn himself is also in a bit of a bind. His publisher is on his back over his lack of recent moneymaking stories.  No one in town wants to cooperate with him, though, because he is an outsider. Eventually, Flynn and Sarah have to join forces to track down the murderer.

I loved the unusual setting and the spooky atmosphere of this book. The author does a wonderful job of describing the wild nature of Tasmania’s east coast, and the insular nature of a small, isolated community. The novel is more a character study than a traditional mystery, and the setting becomes an important part of the puzzle. While the pacing may seem slow to some, I enjoyed the way it gradually built up the suspense. I would recommend this book, especially to fans of Elizabeth George or Tana French.

Find and reserve this book in our catalog.


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